Heaters exist for various types of fuel, including solid fuels, liquids, and gases. Another type of heat source is electricity, normally heating ribbons composed of high resistance wire (see Nichrome). This principle is also used for baseboard heaters and portable heaters. Electrical heaters are often used as backup or supplemental heat for heat pump systems.
Before you rush into replacements, installations, or service for your heating and cooling systems, it’s important to get a trustworthy estimate. With Wm. Price Heating & Cooling, you’ll receive knowledgeable recommendations based on our years of experience and high quality technical training. We analyze your space and needs, and provide an estimate you can count on to be the best. Contact us today to schedule your estimate!
When it comes to your indoor winter comfort, you should never settle.  A perfectly warm home is important to your daily life, and the performance of your heating system impacts the safety, air quality, and cost of keeping an enjoyable home.  Sky Heating & Air Conditioning protects your ongoing satisfaction with a diverse range of quality heating products and services, including new system installation, replacement, seasonal maintenance, and repair.  We work to improve efficiency, reliability, and safety, and deliver corner to corner temperature control throughout the rooms of your home.  With 24/7 Emergency Services, you’re never left out in the cold.  Contact Sky Heating & Air Conditioning for heating service in The Dalles and Portland, OR, and we’ll provide the exemplary customer service that sets us apart.
Dehumidification (air drying) in an air conditioning system is provided by the evaporator. Since the evaporator operates at a temperature below the dew point, moisture in the air condenses on the evaporator coil tubes. This moisture is collected at the bottom of the evaporator in a pan and removed by piping to a central drain or onto the ground outside.
ISO 16813:2006 is one of the ISO building environment standards.[29] It establishes the general principles of building environment design. It takes into account the need to provide a healthy indoor environment for the occupants as well as the need to protect the environment for future generations and promote collaboration among the various parties involved in building environmental design for sustainability. ISO16813 is applicable to new construction and the retrofit of existing buildings.[30]
The standards do not require you to change your existing central air conditioning units, and replacement parts and services should still be available for your home’s systems. The “lifespan” of a central air conditioner is about 15 to 20 years. Manufacturers typically continue to support existing equipment by making replacement parts available and honoring maintenance contracts after the new standard goes into effect.
Though forced-air furnaces are normally quite reliable, they can break down. To avoid break downs, it pays to know how to take care of your furnace and fix it when something goes wrong. Inevitably, a furnace stops working when you need it most. Consequently, fixing becomes urgent very quickly. The following instructions will help. With a little do-it-yourself experience and the proper guidance, you can troubleshoot and repair a variety of furnace problems yourself.
The thermocouple is a copper rod that the pilot flame heats-up. When it gets hot enough, the thermocouple signals that there is enough heat to burn the gas fuel being released into the appliance—and so it allows the gas to be released to the burners. In some cases where the pilot light won’t stay lit, the thermocouple needs to be adjusted or replaced. This is generally a job for a professional.
Air ducts come in two forms: cool air ducts (also known as “return ducts”) and warm air ducts (also known as “supply ducts”). Warm air from the furnace enters the home through the warm air registers. No more than 20: of these warm air ducts and registers should ever be closed off – this hinders air flow and could result in the overheating of the heat exchanger, causing costly damage to you home heating system.
Ventilating or ventilation (the V in HVAC) is the process of exchanging or replacing air in any space to provide high indoor air quality which involves temperature control, oxygen replenishment, and removal of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, carbon dioxide, and other gases. Ventilation removes unpleasant smells and excessive moisture, introduces outside air, keeps interior building air circulating, and prevents stagnation of the interior air.
Inside the unit, the air passes over the evaporator coil first, and is cooled and dehumidified. The now dehumidified, cold air then passes over the condenser coil where it is warmed up again. Then the air is released back into the room. The unit produces warm, dehumidified air and can usually be placed freely in the environment (room) that is to be conditioned.

American design standards are legislated in the Uniform Mechanical Code or International Mechanical Code. In certain states, counties, or cities, either of these codes may be adopted and amended via various legislative processes. These codes are updated and published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) or the International Code Council (ICC) respectively, on a 3-year code development cycle. Typically, local building permit departments are charged with enforcement of these standards on private and certain public properties.
Cleaning the debris that builds up on your filters will aid with the flow of air. When your air filter is clogged, your air handler must work harder to compensate for the blockage of air flow. In addition to driving up your utility bill, the reduced air flow through your heating and cooling system can cause your heat exchanger to overheat and shut off too quickly.    
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