The fan limit switch controls the furnace blower. The fan limit switch has three settings: “Fan On”, “Fan Off”, and “Limit”. In the “Fan Off” setting, the blower will only operate if there is warm air in the plenum to prevent cool air from blowing into the home. The “Fan On” setting will keep the blower operating even after the burner has shutdown, making sure that all of the hot air produced is circulated. The “Limit” setting is a safety control that will turn the burner off in the rare event that the air in the warm air plenum reaches an unsafe temperature. This may be the case if ducts are blocked or if the system controls are malfunctioning.
"I purchased a mobile home recently and the electrical was a mess. One of the circuits was down and the previous owner had wired the breaker box very strange. One outlet (on a working circuit) had an electrical fire that destroyed it. I'm a DIY guy but I haven't done much with electric before so I asked for a quote on this website. Todd called me within the hour, and we set an appointment for 2 days later. He was on time to the appointment and was able to diagnose the problem AND fix my destroyed outlet within 10 minutes (I already had a new outlet ready to be installed). What's more, he didn't even charge me for it, just said that when I was ready to fix my circuit to give him a call (I'm redoing all the plumbing right now). Todd deserves 6 stars. He is an expert at what he does, he's friendly, he's reasonable, and he's fast. Don't hesitate to contact him. I wish more technical professionals were like him."
Central, "all-air" air-conditioning systems (or package systems) with a combined outdoor condenser/evaporator unit are often installed in North American residences, offices, and public buildings, but are difficult to retrofit (install in a building that was not designed to receive it) because of the bulky air ducts required. (Minisplit ductless systems are used in these situations.) Outside of North America, packaged systems are only used in limited applications involving large indoor space such as stadiums, theatres or exhibition halls.
Reinstall the access panel and disconnect block. Turn on the circuit breaker and furnace switch. Then set the thermostat to a lower temperature and wait for the AC to start (see “Be Patient at Startup,” below). The compressor should run and the condenser fan should spin. If the compressor starts but the fan doesn’t, the fan motor is most likely shot. Shut off the power and remove the screws around the condenser cover. Lift the cover and remove the fan blade and motor (photo 7). Reinstall the blade and secure the cover. Then repower the unit and see if the fan starts. If it doesn’t, you’ve given it your best shot—it’s time to call a pro.

If you hear clicking that is followed by a hum or buzz, you’re probably hearing the fan motor attempting to start without the boost it needs from the capacitor. You can almost always conclude that the capacitor has failed. Sometimes you can get the compressor fan spinning (clockwise) by pushing it with a thin stick or long screwdriver poked through the grille. But the chances are good that this might work for one cycle, but the capacitor will fail next time the AC goes on. It’s best to replace the capacitor.


Many homeowners don't often think of the state of their furnace—that is until, the first cold day of the year comes around and the furnace won't turn on or only blows cold air. Keeping an eye out for common signs of trouble can help you avoid a complete furnace breakdown. Addressing any issues early on can also help you avoid most extensive (and therefore, more expensive) repairs down the road.


All modern air conditioning systems, even small window package units, are equipped with internal air filters. These are generally of a lightweight gauzy material, and must be replaced or washed as conditions warrant. For example, a building in a high dust environment, or a home with furry pets, will need to have the filters changed more often than buildings without these dirt loads. Failure to replace these filters as needed will contribute to a lower heat exchange rate, resulting in wasted energy, shortened equipment life, and higher energy bills; low air flow can result in iced-over evaporator coils, which can completely stop air flow. Additionally, very dirty or plugged filters can cause overheating during a heating cycle, and can result in damage to the system or even fire.
In the upcoming year, homeowners in Westminster will be required to install higher efficiency furnaces if they are having a furnace replaced. The new furnace models are more efficient, which means they are better for the environment but they are also more expensive. One of the main reasons Westminster furnace repair will become more expensive after the deadline is because the new furnaces emit more water vapor, which requires new or upgraded ducting. If you a furnace replacement in Westminster and the cost of the project is one of your primary concerns, then you must act fast to have your Westminster furnace replacement completed with an older model.
AC air handler squealing or grinding noises. Though most air handlers have direct-drive motors, some older units may be belt-driven. Squealing sounds from a belt-drive air handler generally occur when the belt that connects the motor to the blower slips. In most cases, the belt is improperly aligned or worn and needs replacement. Follow the instructions above under Air Conditioner Not Blowing Air and refer to your owner’s manual.
Evaporative coolers, sometimes called "swamp coolers", do not have a compressor or condenser. Liquid water is evaporated on the cooling fins, releasing the vapor into the cooled area. Evaporating water absorbs a significant amount of heat, the latent heat of vaporisation, cooling the air. Humans and animals use the same mechanism to cool themselves by sweating.

If the condenser coils are clogged, the compressor can overheat and shut down. You’ll experience intermittent periods of minimal cooling, followed by no cooling. Even if you’re “sure” the condenser coils are clean, clean them again. Turn off the power. Flip the air conditioning service and furnace circuit breakers in your main electrical panel to the “Off” position. Next, turn off the power switch right at the furnace or air handler. Then yank the disconnect block (Photo 1) and clean the condenser coils (Photo 2). If the air conditioning service still doesn’t work properly after you’ve cleaned the condenser coils, installed a new filter and opened all the supply vents, proceed with the following repairs.
R22 (also known as HCFC-22) has a global warming potential about 1,800 times higher than CO2.[61] It was phased out for use in new equipment by 2010, and is to be completely discontinued by 2020. Although these gasses can be recycled when air conditioning units are disposed of, uncontrolled dumping and leaking can release gas directly into the atmosphere.

Finding the right HVAC contractors can be challenging, especially because you’re going to let them into your house. For this reason, our customers chose us. As a longtime staple of the Spokane community, we’ve served customers just like you diligently for years. This excellent customer service has made us an “Elite Service” and “Top Rated” company on HomeAdvisor.

An annual inspection of your unit can ensure that the various potential problems mentioned above are detected early, and before they require complete replacement. During this inspection, for instance, a professional might find small cracks in your heat exchanger or a faulty seal in your blower motor. Some manufacturer's warranties even require these annual inspections to maintain validity. Typically, your furnace inspection will cost between $80 and $150 depending on the area in which you live and the professional you work with.

For all your heating, cooling and plumbing repair in Kansas City, KS, it doesn’t get any better than Anthony Plumbing, Heating, and Cooling. Let us show you why we’re the most trusted in the area; we’re sure that if you experience the hassle free, professional service that we offer, you’ll come back for all your future maintenance and repair needs. After 60 years in business we know what customers deserve, and we’ll be here to provide you with the excellent service you expect for years to come.
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