Furnaces and thermostats are not mix-and-match appliances. Using the wrong type of thermostat with a furnace will cause operating problems and can be dangerous. Although thermostats look similar, they are designed very differently. There are numerous types of heating systems and thermostat systems and they need to be coordinated for safe and proper operation. There are three types of thermostat systems used today: millivoltage, low voltage, and line voltage.​
This job involves removing the access panel, loosening a couple of bolts that hold the blower motor at the proper tension, and adjusting its distance or realigning the belt. In many cases, it’s a good idea to remove the belt and buy a replacement at a home center. Last, when reinstalling the belt, be careful not to over-tighten it; this can wear out the motor bearings.
In the refrigeration cycle, heat is transported from a colder location to a hotter area. As heat would naturally flow in the opposite direction, work is required to achieve this. A refrigerator is an example of such a system, as it transports the heat out of the interior and into its environment. The refrigerant is used as the medium which absorbs and removes heat from the space to be cooled and subsequently ejects that heat elsewhere.
The main problem when installing a multi-split system is the laying of long refrigerant lines for connecting the external unit to the internal ones. While installing a separate split system, workers try to locate both units opposite to each other, where the length of the line is minimal. Installing a multi-split system creates more difficulties, since some of indoor units can be located far from the outside. The first models of multi-split systems had one common control system that did not allow you to set the air conditioning individually for each room. However, now the market has a wide selection of multi-split systems, in which the functional characteristics of indoor units operate separately from each other.

An improperly maintained heating and air conditioning is an inefficient heating and air conditioning system. That’s why we provide appointments for annual inspections with our licensed technicians. It’s our goal to make sure that your home is as comfortable and energy-efficient as possible. For inspections, repairs, and service, contact BGE HOME for quality service.
The cost to replace your entire unit is around $4,000. That expense can range from $2,500 to $5,900, depending on the type and brand of furnace you choose. Brands particularly have an impact on that price. A Goodman electric furnace, will only cost about $2,100 for the unit and labor. On the other hand, a Trane oil furnace may cost up to $9,000 all things considered. Our Furnace Installation Cost Guide can give you a better idea on both the general cost and the differences for brands like Amana, Bryant, Coleman, and others. The brand also plays into the repair cost for your furnace. Especially the prices of individual parts can change; a York heat exchanger, for example, can cost up to $1,900, while the same component from Heil will cost as little as $400.
The thermocouple is a copper rod that the pilot flame heats-up. When it gets hot enough, the thermocouple signals that there is enough heat to burn the gas fuel being released into the appliance—and so it allows the gas to be released to the burners. In some cases where the pilot light won’t stay lit, the thermocouple needs to be adjusted or replaced. This is generally a job for a professional.
The compressor-based refrigerant systems are air-cooled, meaning they use air to exchange heat, in the same way as a car radiator or typical household air conditioner does. Such a system dehumidifies the air as it cools it. It collects water condensed from the cooled air and produces hot air which must be vented outside the cooled area; doing so transfers heat from the air in the cooled area to the outside air.
*We work on all brands: Adams, Aire-Flo, Amana, Arcoaire, Armstrong, Beutler, Bryant, Carrier, Centurion, Coleman, Comfortmaker, Cozy, Daikin, Day & Night, Dayton, Ducane, Emerson, Empire, Evcon, Fedders, Friedrich, Frigidaire, Fujitsu, Gaffers & Statler, General Electric, Gibson, Goldstar, Goodman, GMC, Haier, Heil, Honeywell, Intertherm, Janitrol, Kenmore, Lennox, Luxaire, Maytag, Mitsubishi, Payne, Rheem, Ruud, Samsung, Sanyo, Sears, Sharp, Spartan, Tappan, Tempstar, Thermal Solutions, Trane, Utica, Weatherking, Westinghouse, Whirlpool, Williams, York, and Zephyr.
High-efficiency condensing furnaces (90% AFUE and above) are a bit more complex than conventional furnaces. The main differences between a conventional and condensing furnace are the heat exchanger technology used to extract heat from the combustion process and the method used to exhaust the combustion gases. In these ways, the furnaces are very different. The condensing furnace does not have a significantly more efficient combustion process than does a conventional furnace; both use gas burners with electronic ignition. The difference lies in that the condensing furnace has a more efficient heat extraction process after combustion.
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