Many things can go wrong with your furnace, all of which should be repaired and examined by experienced professionals. Trust Randazzo Heating, Cooling, and Fireplaces to repair and help you maintain your furnace*. We value our customers and their decisions, so we will always be honest and explain the best possible solution for you. Contact us today so we can help you out! Click Here for our warranty policy.
If you need a furnace repaired or an air conditioner serviced, we'll send a local technician out to diagnose the specific problem and recommend solutions for you and your family. There will be a diagnostic fee for the visit, and any specific repairs will be an additional charge. If replacing your system is the best solution, the fee for the diagnosis will be credited toward the purchase and install of a new system.
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]

You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
Reinstall the access panel and disconnect block. Turn on the circuit breaker and furnace switch. Then set the thermostat to a lower temperature and wait for the AC to start (see “Be Patient at Startup,” below). The compressor should run and the condenser fan should spin. If the compressor starts but the fan doesn’t, the fan motor is most likely shot. Shut off the power and remove the screws around the condenser cover. Lift the cover and remove the fan blade and motor (photo 7). Reinstall the blade and secure the cover. Then repower the unit and see if the fan starts. If it doesn’t, you’ve given it your best shot—it’s time to call a pro.

A contactor is a $25 mechanical relay that uses low-voltage power from the thermostat to switch 220-volt high-amperage current to the compressor and condenser fan. AC contactors can wear out and are at the top of the list of common air conditioning service failures. Even if your contactor is working, it pays to replace it every five years or so. Unscrew the old contactor before removing the wires. Then move the wires to the new unit (photo 6).
For starters, once a year, vacuum out the area around the furnace’s blower. If possible, also slide out the fan unit, clean each fan blade with a toothbrush, and then vacuum with a brush attachment on a vacuum cleaner. While you’re at it, look for oil ports on the motor, normally located near the motor shaft. If the motor has these, apply two to three drops of non-detergent motor oil into each port (you may have to remove a cover plate to do this). Though most contemporary motors don’t require lubrication, do lubricate motors with oil ports once a year. For more about maintenance, see Maintenance Checklist for Central Heating Systems.
According to a 2015 government survey, 87% of the homes in the United States use air conditioning and 65% of those homes have central air conditioning. Most of the homes with central air conditioning have programmable thermostats, but approximately two-thirds of the homes with central air do not use this feature to make their homes more energy efficient.[56]
If your air conditioner is old, consider buying an energy-efficient model. Look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels — qualified central units are about 15% more efficient than standard models. New residential central air conditioner standards went into effect on January 1, 2015; see the efficiency standards for central air conditioners for details, and consider purchasing a system with a higher SEER than the minimum for greater savings.
AC air handler buzzing sounds. Do you hear a buzzing sound when you turn on the thermostat? The only thing that comes on in the house when you turn on the thermostat is the fan relay and fan in the air handler or furnace. Try switching the thermostat HEAT/COOL switch to OFF. Then switch the fan switch from AUTO to ON. The fan (only) should come on. If the air handler makes a buzzing sound, it probably has a bad fan relay or, more likely, blower fan.
Located conveniently in Spokane, we know how painful it can be to wait around for weeks for an appointment. Unlike other companies, we’ll do everything that we can to get to you quickly, so that your family can sleep comfortably. Give us a call today, you’ve got nothing to lose, and let us tell you more about the exceptional customer service that we’ve offered to our clients for years.
Start with your utility company; they can help a great deal. Comparing previous bills isn't always a good measure, as the weather is never exactly the same month to month. Instead, if you take your energy bill and divide it by the square footage of livable space in your home, don't count areas like unfinished garages or basements -- you can calculate how much you are spending to heat or cool each square foot of your home. Your energy provider can tell you what the average cost per square foot is in your region for that same period of time so you can compare apples to apples.
The heat pump gained popularity in the 1950s in Japan and the United States.[13] Heat pumps can extract heat from various sources, such as environmental air, exhaust air from a building, or from the ground. Initially, heat pump HVAC systems were only used in moderate climates, but with improvements in low temperature operation and reduced loads due to more efficient homes, they are increasing in popularity in cooler climates.

“Accurate, extremely thorough and knowledgeable quote for a complete replacement AC system for my home. Installation was neat and completed in a day as promised. Everyone was on the same page regarding the entire transaction and all technicians were polite and helpful. No question I would use them for any further AC related problems in the future.” – Daryl
We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?
When natural gas, propane or heating oil are burned in a furnace, the resulting hot combustion gasses by burning natural gas, propane or heating oil circulate through a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger will, in turn, release that heat to be circulated by the furnace’s blower. The flue gas then travels through the flue vent, which carries the gas outside of the home. When a heat exchanger is cracked, it generally will require a complete system replacement. That is one of the reasons why we highly recommend annual preventive maintenance on your home’s furnace – this preventative furnace inspection and maintenance can greatly prolong the life of your home heating system.
HVAC professionals in the US can receive training through formal training institutions, where most earn associate degrees. Training for HVAC technicians includes classroom lectures and hands-on tasks, and can be followed by an apprenticeship wherein the recent graduate works alongside a professional HVAC technician for a temporary period.[31] HVAC techs who have been trained can also be certified in areas such as air conditioning, heat pumps, gas heating, and commercial refrigeration.[32]
When it comes to installing furnaces our Westminster HVAC experts are highly trained to ensure that your gas appliance is installed properly and that there are no gas leaks. In addition to being highly trained our Westminster furnace repair and installation, professionals are also background checked and drug tested. All of our HVAC technicians arrive at your house in an easy to identify Westminster furnace repair & replacement truck for your safety and they always use floor mats to protect your home. To learn more about what we require from our furnace repair and replacement techs, visit this page today.

During the colder months of the year, the comfort of your home depends on the proper working function of your heating system. When your furnace breaks down or stops working properly, reach out to the heating experts at Horizon Services! We have nearly 30 years of experience providing reliable furnace repairs for homeowners throughout Delaware, Southern New Jersey, Southeastern Pennsylvania, and Northeastern Maryland. Our technicians are able to repair just about any type of home furnace using cutting-edge techniques and state-of-the-art tools. We can accurately diagnose the root of the issue and quickly get to work making the necessary repairs. We even offer same day service at no additional cost!
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