If your furnace has a pilot light, look for the flame. Check your owner’s manual or the instructions posted inside the furnace cabinet for step-by-step lighting instructions. Usually this involves first turning the gas valve to Off and waiting a couple of minutes. Then you turn it to Pilot. Next, press and hold it down while you light the flame. Last, wait a minute or so, release it, and then turn it to On.


Ventilating or ventilation (the V in HVAC) is the process of exchanging or replacing air in any space to provide high indoor air quality which involves temperature control, oxygen replenishment, and removal of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, carbon dioxide, and other gases. Ventilation removes unpleasant smells and excessive moisture, introduces outside air, keeps interior building air circulating, and prevents stagnation of the interior air.
Any forced air system in your home - whether it is powered through electric or gas-generated energy - requires a blower motor. This component consists of an electric motor and fan, and is responsible for pushing air evenly through the furnace. As hvac.com points out, you can easily identify the blower motor in your furnace as the part that looks similar to a hamster wheel at the bottom of the unit. If it stops working, the air needed to heat your home will no longer be pushed through the furnace to be heated and distributed evenly. In that case, you need to inquire about potential repairs. Blower motor repair typically costs between $150 for a simple fix, and $450 for complete replacement and installation of the part. Where you land on that range depends on the exact damage.

Cut down on energy costs and prevent damage to your furnace by addressing a gas furnace that's overactive or short cycling. Besides the need for consistently comfortable temperatures, this issue could cause long-term safety issues to your home, making it very important to address. From a faulty thermostat to a dirty filter, there are several possible causes to investigate.
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