Air conditioners often use a fan to distribute the conditioned air to an occupied space such as a building or a car to improve thermal comfort and indoor air quality. Electric refrigerant-based AC units range from small units that can cool a small bedroom, which can be carried by a single adult, to massive units installed on the roof of office towers that can cool an entire building. The cooling is typically achieved through a refrigeration cycle, but sometimes evaporation or free cooling is used. Air conditioning systems can also be made based on desiccants (chemicals which remove moisture from the air) and subterraneous pipes that can distribute the heated refrigerant to the ground for cooling.[2]
A specialized air conditioner that is used only for dehumidifying is called a dehumidifier. It also uses a refrigeration cycle, but differs from a standard air conditioner in that both the evaporator and the condenser are placed in the same air path. A standard air conditioner transfers heat energy out of the room because its condenser coil releases heat outside. However, since all components of the dehumidifier are in the same room, no heat energy is removed. Instead, the electric power consumed by the dehumidifier remains in the room as heat, so the room is actually heated, just as by an electric heater that draws the same amount of power.

Air conditioner equipment power in the U.S. is often described in terms of "tons of refrigeration", with each approximately equal to the cooling power of one short ton (2000 pounds or 907 kilograms) of ice melting in a 24-hour period. The value is defined as 12,000 BTU per hour, or 3517 watts.[32] Residential central air systems are usually from 1 to 5 tons (3.5 to 18 kW) in capacity.


In the refrigeration cycle, heat is transported from a colder location to a hotter area. As heat would naturally flow in the opposite direction, work is required to achieve this. A refrigerator is an example of such a system, as it transports the heat out of the interior and into its environment. The refrigerant is used as the medium which absorbs and removes heat from the space to be cooled and subsequently ejects that heat elsewhere.


HVAC professionals in the US can receive training through formal training institutions, where most earn associate degrees. Training for HVAC technicians includes classroom lectures and hands-on tasks, and can be followed by an apprenticeship wherein the recent graduate works alongside a professional HVAC technician for a temporary period.[31] HVAC techs who have been trained can also be certified in areas such as air conditioning, heat pumps, gas heating, and commercial refrigeration.[32]

In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]


Although HVAC is executed in individual buildings or other enclosed spaces (like NORAD's underground headquarters), the equipment involved is in some cases an extension of a larger district heating (DH) or district cooling (DC) network, or a combined DHC network. In such cases, the operating and maintenance aspects are simplified and metering becomes necessary to bill for the energy that is consumed, and in some cases energy that is returned to the larger system. For example, at a given time one building may be utilizing chilled water for air conditioning and the warm water it returns may be used in another building for heating, or for the overall heating-portion of the DHC network (likely with energy added to boost the temperature).[4][5][6]
Geothermal heating and cooling systems are a great alternative to traditional HVAC systems. With superior performance and outstanding cost savings, geothermal HVAC systems have grown more and more popular. The licensed technicians from Wm. Price Heating & Cooling are more than qualified to provide with all the information you need to know to find out if a geothermal system is right for you. These systems can help you save up to 70% on your heating and cooling bills, and are 50%-75% more efficient than typical gas and oil furnaces. Plus, you don’t have to worry about carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases getting into your home. Contact Wm. Price Heating & Cooling today to learn more about a safer, more environmentally friendly HVAC unit!
This information is not intended as an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, a franchise. It is for information purposes only. Read More Currently, the following states regulate the offer and sale of franchises: California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. If you are a resident of or want to locate a franchise in one of these states, we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with applicable pre-sale registration and disclosure requirements in your state. Read Less Aire Serv is a registered trademark of Aire Serv LLC © Aire Serv | All rights reserved | All Aire Serv franchise locations are independently owned and operated.
Our professional, certified HVAC technicians go through a rigorous in-house training program to ensure they are knowledgeable and committed to providing outstanding customer service. Contact us when you need a repair, service, maintenance or efficiency tune-up for your central air conditioning system. A professional, knowledgeable technician will show up on time, in uniform and will perform the work your system needs to operate at peak efficiency.
Summers in Portland and The Dalles can be the absolute best time of year or pure torture.  Your cooling system makes the difference. Take advantage of perfectly maintained temperatures, superior dehumidification, unprecedented energy efficiency, and outstanding reliability with quality air conditioning products and services from Sky Heating & Air Conditioning.  We protect the enjoyment of your home with precise installation, system replacement, seasonal maintenance, and prompt repair.  Our skilled AC technicians are always on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, providing Emergency Service and protecting the value of your investment.  Every project is answered with a dedication to customer satisfaction that has earned us an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau. Contact Sky Heating & Air Conditioning for air conditioning service in The Dalles and Portland, OR.  
BGE HOME HVAC repair technicians are thoroughly trained and certified to work on all major brands of heating and air conditioning equipment. When your system breaks down and needs a heating and air conditioning repair, you want to call someone you can trust. Need air conditioning service in the middle of the night? Emergency heating and cooling HVAC service is available 24 hours a day by calling 888-243-4663.
We provide plumbing service to Atlanta and the surrounding communities, including: Acworth, Alpharetta, Austell, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Buford, Chamblee, Clarkston, Conyers, Cumming, Dacula, Decatur, Doraville, Douglasville, Duluth, Dunwoody, Fayetteville, Forest Park, Grayson, Holly Springs, Johns Creek, Kennesaw, Lawrenceville, Lilburn, Lithonia, Loganville, Marietta, Milton, Morrow, Norcross, Peach Tree City, Pine Lake, Powder Springs, Roswell, Sandy Springs, Snellville, Stone Mountain, Sugar Hill, Suwanee, and Woodstock, GA.
Though forced-air furnaces are normally quite reliable, they can break down. To avoid break downs, it pays to know how to take care of your furnace and fix it when something goes wrong. Inevitably, a furnace stops working when you need it most. Consequently, fixing becomes urgent very quickly. The following instructions will help. With a little do-it-yourself experience and the proper guidance, you can troubleshoot and repair a variety of furnace problems yourself.
Ground source, or geothermal, heat pumps are similar to ordinary heat pumps, but instead of transferring heat to or from outside air, they rely on the stable, even temperature of the earth to provide heating and air conditioning. Many regions experience seasonal temperature extremes, which would require large-capacity heating and cooling equipment to heat or cool buildings. For example, a conventional heat pump system used to heat a building in Montana's −70 °F (−57 °C) low temperature or cool a building in the highest temperature ever recorded in the US—134 °F (57 °C) in Death Valley, California, in 1913 would require a large amount of energy due to the extreme difference between inside and outside air temperatures. A few feet below the earth's surface, however, the ground remains at a relatively constant temperature. Utilizing this large source of relatively moderate temperature earth, a heating or cooling system's capacity can often be significantly reduced. Although ground temperatures vary according to latitude, at 6 feet (1.8 m) underground, temperatures generally only range from 45 to 75 °F (7 to 24 °C).

For new installation or upgrades to heating/cooling systems, including geothermal and ductless units, the team from Mountain Valley Home Comfort delivers exceptional return from your investment. We stand behind new system installation with a five year labor warranty, and handle every job to higher standards across New Market, Mount Jackson, Timberville, Broadway, Edinburg, Luray, Stanley, Fulks Run, Basye & Harrisonburg, VA.
American design standards are legislated in the Uniform Mechanical Code or International Mechanical Code. In certain states, counties, or cities, either of these codes may be adopted and amended via various legislative processes. These codes are updated and published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) or the International Code Council (ICC) respectively, on a 3-year code development cycle. Typically, local building permit departments are charged with enforcement of these standards on private and certain public properties.
Air ducts come in two forms: cool air ducts (also known as “return ducts”) and warm air ducts (also known as “supply ducts”). Warm air from the furnace enters the home through the warm air registers. No more than 20: of these warm air ducts and registers should ever be closed off – this hinders air flow and could result in the overheating of the heat exchanger, causing costly damage to you home heating system.

If you need a furnace repaired or an air conditioner serviced, we'll send a local technician out to diagnose the specific problem and recommend solutions for you and your family. There will be a diagnostic fee for the visit, and any specific repairs will be an additional charge. If replacing your system is the best solution, the fee for the diagnosis will be credited toward the purchase and install of a new system.


Some systems include an "economizer mode", which is sometimes called a "free-cooling mode". When economizing, the control system will open (fully or partially) the outside air damper and close (fully or partially) the return air damper. This will cause fresh, outside air to be supplied to the system. When the outside air is cooler than the demanded cool air, this will allow the demand to be met without using the mechanical supply of cooling (typically chilled water or a direct expansion "DX" unit), thus saving energy. The control system can compare the temperature of the outside air vs. return air, or it can compare the enthalpy of the air, as is frequently done in climates where humidity is more of an issue. In both cases, the outside air must be less energetic than the return air for the system to enter the economizer mode.

Ground source, or geothermal, heat pumps are similar to ordinary heat pumps, but instead of transferring heat to or from outside air, they rely on the stable, even temperature of the earth to provide heating and air conditioning. Many regions experience seasonal temperature extremes, which would require large-capacity heating and cooling equipment to heat or cool buildings. For example, a conventional heat pump system used to heat a building in Montana's −70 °F (−57 °C) low temperature or cool a building in the highest temperature ever recorded in the US—134 °F (57 °C) in Death Valley, California, in 1913 would require a large amount of energy due to the extreme difference between inside and outside air temperatures. A few feet below the earth's surface, however, the ground remains at a relatively constant temperature. Utilizing this large source of relatively moderate temperature earth, a heating or cooling system's capacity can often be significantly reduced. Although ground temperatures vary according to latitude, at 6 feet (1.8 m) underground, temperatures generally only range from 45 to 75 °F (7 to 24 °C).
Bonney’s NATE certified technicians will troubleshoot and repair your furnace for safe and reliable operation. Our technicians use state of the art tools including video inspection cameras and exhaust gas analyzers to perform thorough, comprehensive diagnostics when equipment is broken. Furthermore, we arrive in a “warehouse on wheels” stocked with many parts to get your furnace repaired as quickly as possible.  For an unexpected heater repair Bonney offers financing to make your comfort affordable.
You might guess it from the name: the heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that actually heats the air your blower motor pushes through the furnace. It consists of a chamber in which the heat energy produced by natural or propane gas is transferred to the forced air. At the same time, this part also includes a vent through which the gases themselves are safely removed from the unit and the air that enters your home. Because of these gases, a problem with your heat exchanger needs to be dealt with promptly. Over time, cracks in the exchanger can result in carbon monoxide leaks. Taking care of the problem once again means understanding the existence of a range: repairing your heat exchanger can cost as little as $100, but a full replacement may cost up to $1,200.
Mitsubishi Electric is a world leader in air conditioning systems for residential, commercial and industrial use. Challenged to create air conditioning systems that provide exemplary performance in the wide-ranging climatic conditions found throughout Japan, our engineers develop amazingly sophisticated yet durable units and systems capable of constant use under virtually any natural climatic condition on earth.
Before selecting the installation location of air conditioner, several main factors need to be considered. First of all, the direction of air flow from the indoor units should not fall on the place of rest or work area. Secondly, there should not be any obstacles on the way of the airflow that might prevent it from covering the space of the premises as much as possible. The outdoor unit must also be located in an open space, otherwise the heat from the house will not be effectively discharged outside and the productivity of the entire system will drop sharply. It is highly advisable to install the air conditioner units in easily accessible places, for further maintenance during operation.

We provide plumbing service to Atlanta and the surrounding communities, including: Acworth, Alpharetta, Austell, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Buford, Chamblee, Clarkston, Conyers, Cumming, Dacula, Decatur, Doraville, Douglasville, Duluth, Dunwoody, Fayetteville, Forest Park, Grayson, Holly Springs, Johns Creek, Kennesaw, Lawrenceville, Lilburn, Lithonia, Loganville, Marietta, Milton, Morrow, Norcross, Peach Tree City, Pine Lake, Powder Springs, Roswell, Sandy Springs, Snellville, Stone Mountain, Sugar Hill, Suwanee, and Woodstock, GA. Click Here for Denver Furnace Repair
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