In 1995, Germany made CFC refrigerators illegal.[22] DuPont and other companies blocked the refrigerant in the U.S. with the U.S. EPA, disparaging the approach as "that German technology".[21][23] Nevertheless, in 2004, Greenpeace worked with multinational corporations like Coca-Cola and Unilever, and later Pepsico and others, to create a corporate coalition called Refrigerants Naturally!.[22][24] Then, four years later, Ben & Jerry's of Unilever and General Electric began to take steps to support production and use in the U.S.[25] In 2011 the EPA decided in favor of the ozone- and climate-safe refrigerant for U.S. manufacture.[17][26][27]


Are you considering whether you need to replace your home’s central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning unit—commonly known as your HVAC system? As a general rule, if your existing HVAC system is more than 15 years old, it’s only a matter of time before it starts to cost more to maintain than it would to replace it with a new system. In addition to higher energy bills brought on by a system that can no longer function at peak efficiency, repair costs will also start to add up as parts are replaced and the ventilation system undergoes major overhauls.

Finally, don't underestimate the thermostat as a potential reason why your furnace is not working. Everything on the heating unit itself may function perfectly, but your home still will not heat right if the console you use to set the temperature doesn't communicate your input. A faulty thermostat can either be due to the wall unit itself, or the wiring that connects it to your furnace. Average thermostat repair costs are between $108 and $282, including labor. Replacement costs, of course, depend on the thermostat you choose. Visit our thermostat repair cost guide to learn more about this type of issue.
As an Atlanta resident, you’re well aware that the weather in our area can go through extremes of both hot and cold throughout the year, taxing your heating and cooling system to its limits. You’ll likely encounter the need for repair or replacement at some point. If you need HVAC installation, HVAC maintenance, or HVAC service and repair, R.S. Andrews is the most trusted name in Atlanta.
An electric furnace provides warmth by moving air over and through a series of coils. Ductwork and vents then distribute that air to the individual rooms in your home. Repair costs will depend on both the brand and the exact nature of the problem, but tend to be lower than some of the options above. That's because the units are small, and issues tend to be contained within the heating elements themselves. Expect to spend less than $300 on your electric furnace repair, depending on the exact problem.
Natural ventilation is a key factor in reducing the spread of airborne illnesses such as tuberculosis, the common cold, influenza and meningitis. Opening doors, windows, and using ceiling fans are all ways to maximize natural ventilation and reduce the risk of airborne contagion. Natural ventilation requires little maintenance and is inexpensive.[19]
Geothermal heating and cooling systems are a great alternative to traditional HVAC systems. With superior performance and outstanding cost savings, geothermal HVAC systems have grown more and more popular. The licensed technicians from Wm. Price Heating & Cooling are more than qualified to provide with all the information you need to know to find out if a geothermal system is right for you. These systems can help you save up to 70% on your heating and cooling bills, and are 50%-75% more efficient than typical gas and oil furnaces. Plus, you don’t have to worry about carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases getting into your home. Contact Wm. Price Heating & Cooling today to learn more about a safer, more environmentally friendly HVAC unit!
The main purpose of your furnace filter is to ensure that none of the additional materials your fans pull back into the unit - such as hair and dust - actually damage the furnace or its parts. In the process, it also improves air quality in your home. Some annual inspections will include changing and cleaning this part of the unit. That said, you can also clean or change your furnace filteryourself. Costs for new filters range based on brand, but tend to be around $30.
Reinstall the access panel and disconnect block. Turn on the circuit breaker and furnace switch. Then set the thermostat to a lower temperature and wait for the AC to start (see “Be Patient at Startup,” below). The compressor should run and the condenser fan should spin. If the compressor starts but the fan doesn’t, the fan motor is most likely shot. Shut off the power and remove the screws around the condenser cover. Lift the cover and remove the fan blade and motor (photo 7). Reinstall the blade and secure the cover. Then repower the unit and see if the fan starts. If it doesn’t, you’ve given it your best shot—it’s time to call a pro.
For starters, once a year, vacuum out the area around the furnace’s blower. If possible, also slide out the fan unit, clean each fan blade with a toothbrush, and then vacuum with a brush attachment on a vacuum cleaner. While you’re at it, look for oil ports on the motor, normally located near the motor shaft. If the motor has these, apply two to three drops of non-detergent motor oil into each port (you may have to remove a cover plate to do this). Though most contemporary motors don’t require lubrication, do lubricate motors with oil ports once a year. For more about maintenance, see Maintenance Checklist for Central Heating Systems.
Are you considering whether you need to replace your home’s central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning unit—commonly known as your HVAC system? As a general rule, if your existing HVAC system is more than 15 years old, it’s only a matter of time before it starts to cost more to maintain than it would to replace it with a new system. In addition to higher energy bills brought on by a system that can no longer function at peak efficiency, repair costs will also start to add up as parts are replaced and the ventilation system undergoes major overhauls.

Inspect your furnace thermostat by first making sure that it’s turned on. Also, ensure that the thermostat switch is turned to “heat” and not “cool”. If your furnace will still not start with the thermostat on, try adjusting the temperature settings to a few degrees higher. Inspect any visible wires for breaks or splits, and make sure your thermostat batteries are not dead. Do not touch any open wires; contact a professional.
Your furnace's flame sensor is essentially a safety mechanism. As a thin metallic rod in front of the flame inside the unit, it's sole purpose is to confirm that your gas valves only open when a flame actually exists to burn that gas. When the flame sensor stop working, on the other hand, gas leaks can occur. To repair your furnace's flame sensor, expect to spend between $80 and $250. Even a full replacement of this part typically does not go above that range.

At Wm. Price Heating & Cooling, we know how uncomfortable it can be to live without a reliable air conditioning system in Girard, Austintown, Canfield, Niles, Youngstown & Boardman, OH. We provide regular air conditioner maintenance, high quality repairs, and expert installations to our valued customers across Girard, Austintown, Canfield, Niles, Youngstown & Boardman, OH. You’ll enjoy superior comfort all season long with services from Wm. Price Heating & Cooling. Our A/C technicians are highly trained and qualified, as well as dedicated to cleanliness and efficiency. We’re known for our unique red booties, which protect your home from dirt and damage. As a proud Carrier Factory Authorized Dealer, we provide industry leading cooling products, so you know you’ll have the best cooling products in your home or commercial space. Give us a call today to learn about all the air conditioning services we have to provide!


Air conditioner inverter Air door Air filter Air handler Air ionizer Air-mixing plenum Air purifier Air source heat pumps Automatic balancing valve Back boiler Barrier pipe Blast damper Boiler Centrifugal fan Ceramic heater Chiller Condensate pump Condenser Condensing boiler Convection heater Cooling tower Damper Dehumidifier Duct Economizer Electrostatic precipitator Evaporative cooler Evaporator Exhaust hood Expansion tank Fan coil unit Fan heater Fire damper Fireplace Fireplace insert Freeze stat Flue Freon Fume hood Furnace Furnace room Gas compressor Gas heater Gasoline heater Geothermal heat pump Grease duct Grille Ground-coupled heat exchanger Heat exchanger Heat pipe Heat pump Heating film Heating system High efficiency glandless circulating pump High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) High pressure cut off switch Humidifier Infrared heater Inverter compressor Kerosene heater Louver Mechanical fan Mechanical room Oil heater Packaged terminal air conditioner Plenum space Pressurisation ductwork Process duct work Radiator Radiator reflector Recuperator Refrigerant Register Reversing valve Run-around coil Scroll compressor Solar chimney Solar-assisted heat pump Space heater Smoke exhaust ductwork Thermal expansion valve Thermal wheel Thermosiphon Thermostatic radiator valve Trickle vent Trombe wall Turning vanes Ultra-low particulate air (ULPA) Whole-house fan Windcatcher Wood-burning stove
If you believe that the ac not working or you’re getting little or no cold air, check these three things first. Make sure all the registers in the house are wide open. Then be sure the furnace filter is clean. Then go outside and clean off the condenser coils (Photo 2). If several registers were closed or the filter was clogged, the reduced airflow could have caused the evaporator coil to ice up and stop cooling your home. If you’ve changed the filter and opened all the registers and you’re still not getting airflow at the registers, deice the A-coil. Move the thermostat mode switch from “Cooling” to “Off” and move the fan switch from “Auto” to “On.” Let the blower run for at least 30 minutes or until there’s good airflow at the registers. Then turn the AC back on to test it. If it works for the next 12 hours, you’ve solved the problem.
High-efficiency condensing furnaces (90% AFUE and above) are a bit more complex than conventional furnaces. The main differences between a conventional and condensing furnace are the heat exchanger technology used to extract heat from the combustion process and the method used to exhaust the combustion gases. In these ways, the furnaces are very different. The condensing furnace does not have a significantly more efficient combustion process than does a conventional furnace; both use gas burners with electronic ignition. The difference lies in that the condensing furnace has a more efficient heat extraction process after combustion.
×