Mountain Valley Home Comfort provides expert heating and cooling services in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley.  Our team of licensed, trained, and experienced professionals handle new installation, retrofit projects, seasonal maintenance and challenging repairs.  When you call on Mountain Valley Home Comfort at (540) 740-3844, we target sustainable solutions to temperature control, saving you time and money, and protecting comfort and budget. Personalizing our services to meet your needs, we ensure the right answer to any requirement.  With organized job sites, swift response, and quick turnaround, our professionals resolve any difficulty and take the best possible care of your essential HVAC equipment.
An important component of natural ventilation is air change rate or air changes per hour: the hourly rate of ventilation divided by the volume of the space. For example, six air changes per hour means an amount of new air, equal to the volume of the space, is added every ten minutes. For human comfort, a minimum of four air changes per hour is typical, though warehouses might have only two. Too high of an air change rate may be uncomfortable, akin to a wind tunnel which have thousands of changes per hour. The highest air change rates are for crowded spaces, bars, night clubs, commercial kitchens at around 30 to 50 air changes per hour.[17]
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]
In order to make your everyday life easier and more enjoyable, Sky Heating & Air Conditioning specializes in state-of-the-art heating and cooling technology, partnering with Trane, Mitsubishi, and Waterfurnace.  We bring you HVAC solutions that represent the best the industry has to offer, ensuring long-term performance and satisfaction.  Whether you’re looking for the design/build of a new system, replacement, or hoping to cut costs and enhance convenience, we answer with proven products.  Our qualified HVAC technicians help you determine the ideal solution for your exact requirements, and make sure you’re happy with every step of the process.  From ductless HVAC to geothermal heating and cooling systems, we offer a wide selection of options and comprehensive services to answer any type of challenge.  Call on Sky Heating & Air Conditioning and let us exceed your expectations today!
what should be the length of the drain vent. I had it at the roof level. But since I am getting bad smell in my house via bathrooms (or may be via roof door), I have just extended the length of the vent pipe. Is there any scientific method to estimate the right length? Plus is there any tester to test from where the bad sewage odor is coming from into the living room. It's a two-story villa.
Furnaces and thermostats are not mix-and-match appliances. Using the wrong type of thermostat with a furnace will cause operating problems and can be dangerous. Although thermostats look similar, they are designed very differently. There are numerous types of heating systems and thermostat systems and they need to be coordinated for safe and proper operation. There are three types of thermostat systems used today: millivoltage, low voltage, and line voltage.​
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