Established in 1937, Wm. Price Heating & Cooling has earned recognition as the guys in the red booties.  Our unique foot coverings set us apart for more than a clean-free, damage-free work site.  Home and business owners across Trumbull County, Columbiana County, Mahoning County, Ashtabula County, Stark County, and parts of Western Pennsylvania trust our HVAC company to prioritize their best interests and deliver affordable, innovative, and reliable heating and cooling solutions.  From the installation of thermostats, air filters, air conditioners, furnaces, heat pumps, and ductless HVAC systems, to regular upkeep and repairs, we handle every project with the same dedication to start-to-finish excellence.  When it comes to your indoor comfort, health, and safety, no corners should ever be cut.  And since the performance of your heating and air conditioning system impacts your budget and value of your home, nothing should ever be left to chance.  Know that Wm. Price Heating & Cooling is dedicated to providing service that satisfies your goals for cost, comfort, and convenience.  We provide precise sizing and installation, comprehensive Service Agreements, and prompt response to repair needs.  For any problems outside of regular business hours, our expert team is always on call to assist you with 24 hour Emergency Service.
Ground source, or geothermal, heat pumps are similar to ordinary heat pumps, but instead of transferring heat to or from outside air, they rely on the stable, even temperature of the earth to provide heating and air conditioning. Many regions experience seasonal temperature extremes, which would require large-capacity heating and cooling equipment to heat or cool buildings. For example, a conventional heat pump system used to heat a building in Montana's −70 °F (−57 °C) low temperature or cool a building in the highest temperature ever recorded in the US—134 °F (57 °C) in Death Valley, California, in 1913 would require a large amount of energy due to the extreme difference between inside and outside air temperatures. A few feet below the earth's surface, however, the ground remains at a relatively constant temperature. Utilizing this large source of relatively moderate temperature earth, a heating or cooling system's capacity can often be significantly reduced. Although ground temperatures vary according to latitude, at 6 feet (1.8 m) underground, temperatures generally only range from 45 to 75 °F (7 to 24 °C).
Some systems include an "economizer mode", which is sometimes called a "free-cooling mode". When economizing, the control system will open (fully or partially) the outside air damper and close (fully or partially) the return air damper. This will cause fresh, outside air to be supplied to the system. When the outside air is cooler than the demanded cool air, this will allow the demand to be met without using the mechanical supply of cooling (typically chilled water or a direct expansion "DX" unit), thus saving energy. The control system can compare the temperature of the outside air vs. return air, or it can compare the enthalpy of the air, as is frequently done in climates where humidity is more of an issue. In both cases, the outside air must be less energetic than the return air for the system to enter the economizer mode.

With the ice and snow in the Charlotte area this week be sure to look at your outdoor unit for ice or snow buildup, especially if you have a heat pump. You can carefully attempt to remove any frozen buildup by pouring warm water over the unit to melt the snow and ice. Do not use any sharp objects to pick or knock the ice off, this could cause severe damage to the unit


Air conditioners can create a lot of water because they remove moisture from the air. To get rid of this, they have a [usually plastic] drain pipe that comes out of the side of the air handler. Over time, algae can block this pipe and, when it does, the AC won’t work. In fact, some condensate drains have a float switch that won’t let the AC run if water backs-up. Water can also puddle around the unit or flood the area. To deal with condensate problems, please see Air Conditioner Leaks Water, below.

Are you considering whether you need to replace your home’s central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning unit—commonly known as your HVAC system? As a general rule, if your existing HVAC system is more than 15 years old, it’s only a matter of time before it starts to cost more to maintain than it would to replace it with a new system. In addition to higher energy bills brought on by a system that can no longer function at peak efficiency, repair costs will also start to add up as parts are replaced and the ventilation system undergoes major overhauls.
For residential homes, some countries set minimum requirements for energy efficiency. In the United States, the efficiency of air conditioners is often (but not always) rated by the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER). The higher the SEER rating, the more energy efficient is the air conditioner. The SEER rating is the BTU of cooling output during its normal annual usage divided by the total electric energy input in watt hours (W·h) during the same period.[33]
When natural gas, propane or heating oil are burned in a furnace, the resulting hot combustion gasses by burning natural gas, propane or heating oil circulate through a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger will, in turn, release that heat to be circulated by the furnace’s blower. The flue gas then travels through the flue vent, which carries the gas outside of the home. When a heat exchanger is cracked, it generally will require a complete system replacement. That is one of the reasons why we highly recommend annual preventive maintenance on your home’s furnace – this preventative furnace inspection and maintenance can greatly prolong the life of your home heating system.
High-efficiency condensing furnaces (90% AFUE and above) are a bit more complex than conventional furnaces. The main differences between a conventional and condensing furnace are the heat exchanger technology used to extract heat from the combustion process and the method used to exhaust the combustion gases. In these ways, the furnaces are very different. The condensing furnace does not have a significantly more efficient combustion process than does a conventional furnace; both use gas burners with electronic ignition. The difference lies in that the condensing furnace has a more efficient heat extraction process after combustion.
×